Measles Mumps and Rubella FAQS

Measles

Why vaccinate adults against measles?

  • Complications from measles are more common among adults. Approximately 20 percent of those with measles experience one or more complications including diarrhea, ear infections, pneumonia, encephalitis, seizures, and death.
  • Measles is extremely contagious; 90 percent of susceptible household contacts of a person with measles will become infected.

Which adults should get vaccinated against measles?

  • Adults born in 1957 or later who have not been vaccinated or have not had measles.
  • College students, teachers, healthcare personnel, and international travelers are at increased risk for measles.
  • Measles is part of a combination vaccine called MMR that also protects against mumps and rubella

What happens when someone gets measles? 

  • Symptoms of measles include high fever, rash, runny nose, pink and watery eyes, coughing, diarrhea, and earache.
  • The risk of death from measles is highest for adults and infants.
  • Measles is very contagious; you can get it just by being in the same room with an infected person.
  • The US is experiencing a rise in measles cases related to unimmunized US travelers bringing the infection back from other countries, mostly in Europe.

FAQ: Can I just get a measles vaccine instead of MMR?

No; MMR is the only vaccine available. The MMR vaccine is very safe and effective with few side effects. You may get mild reactions like fever, redness, or swelling at the injection site. Some adult women may infrequently have temporary joint pain or stiffness after receiving MMR vaccine.

Source: http://www.adultvaccination.org/vpd/measles#sthash.F7QThfgH.dpuf

Mumps

Which adults should get vaccinated against mumps?

  • Adults born in 1957 or later who have not been vaccinated or have not had mumps.
  • College students, teachers, healthcare personnel, and international travelers are at increased risk for mumps.
  • Mumps is part of a combination vaccine called MMR that also protects against measles and rubella.
  • Symptoms of the mumps include low grade fever and swelling or tenderness in the salivary glands in the cheeks and under the jaw.
  • In males who have gone through puberty, two or three of every 10 will experience testicular pain and swelling.
  • Not everyone will have the typical symptoms; many infected people will just have respiratory symptoms without any swollen glands.

Why is mumps vaccine important?
Serious complications of mumps are more common among adults than children.

  • Rare complications caused by mumps include infections of the brain and spinal cord, arthritis, kidney and pancreas problems, deafness, and inflammation of the ovaries.

FAQ: Is mumps still a problem in the US?

As recently as 2006 and 2009-10, the US experienced large mumps outbreaks. The ages affected by outbreaks can vary. In 2006, most cases were in people age 18 to 24; in 2009-2010, the majority was in adolescents age 11 to 17.

Source:  http://www.adultvaccination.org/vpd/mumps#sthash.ThhO4PTD.dpuf

Rubella (German Measles)

Which adults should get vaccinated against rubella (also called German measles)?

  • Adults born in 1957 or later who have not been vaccinated or have not had rubella.
  • Non-pregnant women of childbearing age no matter what year they were born.
  • College students, teachers, healthcare personnel, and international travelers are at increased risk for rubella.
  • Rubella is part of a combination vaccine called MMR that also protects against measles and mumps.

  What happens when someone gets rubella?

  • Symptoms of rubella include rash, slight fever, aching joints, and reddened eyes.
  • The rash first appears on the face, but then will continue to spread over the entire body.
  • The lymph nodes behind the ears and the back of the neck may swell, causing soreness and pain.

Why is rubella vaccine important?

  • If a pregnant woman gets rubella during pregnancy, her baby is at risk of serious birth defects including heart defects, mental retardation, liver and spleen damage, and deafness.  There is a 20 percent chance of damage to the fetus if a woman is infected with rubella early in pregnancy.

FAQ: How do you get rubella?

Rubella is a virus that is spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Source: http://www.adultvaccination.org/vpd/rubella#sthash.1l8kRTF9.dpuf

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