Pregnancy & Flu

CDC estimates annual influenza vaccination coverage for the United States by utilizing data from several nationally representative surveys: the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), and the National Immunization Survey-Flu. (NIS-Flu). Internet panel surveys of adultshealth care personnel, and pregnant women are also used. CDC's FluVaxView webpage provides vaccination coverage estimates for current and previous influenza seasons, reports, interactive figures, and data tables.

2016-2017 Flu Vaccination Rate Estimates in Pregnant Women 

As of early November 2016, flu vaccination coverage among pregnant women before and during pregnancy was 46.6%, approximately 6 percentage points higher compared with 2015-16 early-season vaccination coverage (40.2%). 

  • In the previous two flu seasons, vaccination coverage increased by approximately 7-10 percentage points from the early season to the end of the season. 

  • Most women (98.7%) reported visiting a doctor or other medical professional at least once since July 1, 2016. Among these women, 60.2% reported receiving a recommendation for and offer of vaccination from a doctor or other medical professional, 14.2% received only a recommendation for and no offer of flu vaccination, and 24.3% did not receive a recommendation or an offer for flu vaccination, similar to the proportions from November 2015 (61.6%, 15.0% and 23.4%, respectively).

  • Women who reported receiving a provider recommendation for and offer of vaccination were more than twice as likely to be vaccinated compared with women who received only a recommendation but no offer of vaccination (65.7% vs. 29.8%) and six times more likely to be vaccinated compared with women who did not receive a recommendation or an offer for vaccination (65.7% vs 11.1%). 

2015-2016 Flu Vaccination Rate Estimates in Pregnant Women 

As of early November 2015, flu vaccination coverage before and during pregnancy among pregnant women was 40.2%, similar to 2013-14 early season vaccination coverage (43.5%)

  • Non-Hispanic black pregnant women had the lowest flu vaccination coverage (32.9%) compared to the other three racial/ethnic groups (non-Hispanic white: 39.9%, Hispanic: 44.6%, and non-Hispanic other: 46.4%). 

  • Most women (97.8%) reported visiting a doctor or other medical professional at least once since July 1, 2015. Among these women, 61.6% reported receiving a recommendation for and offer of vaccination from a doctor or other medical professional, 15.0% received only a recommendation for and no offer of vaccination, and 23.4% did not receive a recommendation for flu vaccination which were similar to the proportions in November 2014 (59.5%, 15.3% and 25.1%, respectively).

  • Women who received a recommendation for and an offer of vaccination from a doctor or other medical professional were more likely to be vaccinated.

    • They were almost three times more likely to be vaccinated as women who received only a recommendation for vaccination but no offer of vaccination (58.8% vs. 20.1%) and eight times more likely to be vaccinated as women who did not receive a recommendation for vaccination (58.8% vs.7.1%)

    • Vaccination coverage among those who received provider recommendation and offer for vaccination (58.8%) or among those who received recommendation only (20.1%) were lower compared to November 2014 (65.2% and 25.5%, respectively).  

To assist in increasing flu vaccination rates, view the following webpages on Immunization for Women 

 

 

 

 

 Updated 12/1/17

This website is supported by an independent educational grant from Merck and an educational grant from Sanofi Pasteur U.S. 
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